What you need to know

Job advice

Can You Ever Recover from a “NCNS” Situation?

Our #1 priority at That’s Good HR is finding great candidates for great clients.  It’s what we do every day and we do it because we know we can help people.  That assistance includes helping people avoid one of the biggest mistakes that can be made.  That mistake is getting labeled as a “NCNS”.

The term “no call, no show” (NCNS) is attributed to a person that doesn’t show up to an assigned place or time.  This could be for a day of work or for an interview.  It is deemed as highly unprofessional and often can have repercussions beyond just that one day. This situation should be avoided at all costs but as LinkedIn notes, people are “ghosting” now more than ever due to the tight job market.  If you find yourself in a seemingly impossible situation that will result in a no show, you need to make every attempt to communicate to your manager or hiring manager and recruiter.  In this situation, over-communication is best – call, email AND text (yes, all three).  Your job – either keeping one or getting one – is your priority and TGHR can help you manage that priority.

Is it possible to recover from a no call, no show situation?  Yes, but it is extremely difficult.  First, you need to have a valid reason for your manager or the hiring manager.  This needs to be true and monumental, like an unfortunate death in the family.  But stick with the truth, fabricating an excuse will make the situation worse down the line.

Next, you’ll want to apologize to any coworkers if you are currently working.  Your absence likely impacted them, and an apology would begin to repair broken trust. If you are currently working, you need to know the applicable policies that are in place.  Is there a no tolerance policy? What are your company’s repercussions?  Knowing the policy will help you understand the consequences you will inevitably be faced with.

Finally, don’t forget to communicate with your recruiter.  They need to be made aware of the situation as soon as possible.  The same courtesies need to be extended and a valid reason needs to be shared.  TGHR recruiters are experts in staffing and experts in knowing when something does not add up, so be forthcoming as an attempt to salvage the relationship.

Bottom line – it’s best to avoid this situation altogether.  If there are extenuating circumstances, relationships with your manager, hiring manager, co-workers or recruiters may be able to be salvaged, but do you really want to take that risk?

We’d love to help you. Give us a call. 317.469.4141